Molecular Gastronomy

A kitchen that looks like a science lab complete with beakers full of liquid nitrogen,syringes and odd shaped tools right out of a ‘Breaking Bad’ scene may seem unappealing to some, but to others it’s a revolutionary way of creating unique food experiences.

Molecular Gastronomy

Molecular Gastronomy is the integration of science, flavor, passion and art. The term, originally coined in 1988 by Oxford Physicist Nicholas Kurti and French chemist Herve Thise, is used to describe a specific sub-section of food science that studies the physical and chemical transformations of ingredients that occur during the cooking process. Sounds about as exciting as a science exam but in the right hands, it can delight even the toughest critic.

A chocolate that oozes out smoke; mince pie sodas, a pork belly masquerading as French toast; a salad that looks like a bed of rice, orange infused snow that disappears into just an essence as it touches your tongue – that’s what molecular gastronomy is all about. Thanks to unique ingredients and ingenious processes that go into the preparation, tables are taken over by drama, palettes are introduced to inspired fusions and the senses are overwhelmed. Food becomes integrated into the event in ways never imagined.

Molecular Gastronomy is the integration of science, flavor, passion and art. The term, originally coined in 1988 by Oxford Physicist Nicholas Kurti and French chemist Herve Thise, is used to describe a specific sub-section of food science that studies the physical and chemical transformations of ingredients that occur during the cooking process. Sounds about as exciting as a science exam but in the right hands, it can delight even the toughest critic.
A chocolate that oozes out smoke; mince pie sodas, a pork belly masquerading as French toast; a salad that looks like a bed of rice, orange infused snow that disappears into just an essence as it touches your tongue – that’s what molecular gastronomy is all about. Thanks to unique ingredients and ingenious processes that go into the preparation, tables are taken over by drama, palettes are introduced to inspired fusions and the senses are overwhelmed. Food becomes integrated into the event in ways never imagined.

Not everyone’s a fan. Indeed many chefs shy away from terms they consider almost clinical. They prefer instead to describe themselves as “modernist cuisine specialists” or “experimental chefs” creating “avant-garde cuisine” but in the end it’s the same thing. Driven by a desire to create new flavours, break new ground and create without the shackles of the traditional kitchen, today’s forward thinking chefs are pushing the definition of food every day. The possible is only limited by imagination and inspiration.

Serving sizes are small allowing for multi-course meals that tell a story – many chapters captivating the pallet like a delicious novel. This is not comfort food and it’s definitely not your mother’s kitchen. Creativity combined with a technical understanding of food, married to unique flavours are the rule.

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